Almost everyone wants a good relationship. We want to live “happily ever after.” If we create a good relationship with our partner, research finds that we will live “healthier ever after,” too. 

There could be many reasons why good relationships lead to good health. Your partner can support you when you’re stressed. He or she also can encourage you to keep doctor’s appointments, take your medications, drink less alcohol, and exercise more.

Whatever the mechanism, we know that if you’re in a good relationship, you’ll have lower cortisol and less inflammation in your blood, putting you at a lower risk for many serious diseases.

Stop Arguing to Live Longer

The reverse is also true. For example, if you have a lot of conflict in your relationship, you are likely to

  • Feel more pain on days when you argue with your partner.
  • Die if you have a heart attack, a stroke, or get cancer.
  • Get dementia as you age.

Even the way you handle conflict affects your health. One study tracked couples for 20 years. It turned out that partners who exploded in anger were more like to develop heart disease. Partners who stonewalled, on the other hand, were more likely to have backaches, stiff necks, and muscle tension.

Learn How to Argue Well

The bottom line? Learn how to solve problems without arguing. If you do have a fight, learn how to use positive words and assertive, not aggressive, communication. If you don’t, you’re risking your health and longevity — as well as your partner’s.

Old habits are hard to break. It’s human nature to slip into old ways of doing things the minute we stop trying.

If you are finding it hard to improve your relationship, we can help. We’ll teach you good communication skills that will help you talk without blowing up or storming off in anger.

Feel free to contact us for a free consultation, to learn about us and see how we can help.

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